Treblinka

The Treblinka death camp was located 62 miles northeast of Warsaw, near the railroad junction at the village of Malkinia Górna, which is 1.5 miles from the train station in the tiny village of Treblinka.

The first Jews to be deported to the Treblinka death camp were from the Warsaw ghetto; the first transport of 6,000 Jews arrived at Treblinka at about 9:30 on 23 July 1942. Between late July and September 1942, the Germans transported more than 300,000 Jews from the Warsaw ghetto to Treblinka Jews were also deported to Treblinka from Lublin and Bialystok, two major cities in eastern Poland. Others were transported to Treblinka from the what is now the Czech Republic. Approximately 2,000 Gypsies were also sent to Treblinka and murdered in the gas chambers

The terms "evacuation" and "transportation to the East" were Nazi code words for sending the Jews to death camps where they were murdered in the gas chambers. The words "resettled" and "liquidated," when used to refer to the Jews, were also euphemisms which meant killed in the gas chambers.

Besides the freight trains that carried the Jews in box cars to Treblinka, there were also passenger trains with 3,000 people on board each train, as well as trucks and horse-drawn wagons that brought the victims to Treblinka.

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Cattle cars used to transport Jews to Treblinka death camp

Samuel Rajzman, one of the few survivors of Treblinka, testified at the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal that "Between July and December 1942, an average of 3 transports of 60 cars each arrived every day. In 1943 the transports arrived more rarely." Rajzman stated that "On an average, I believe they killed in Treblinka from ten to twelve thousand persons daily."

The following testimony was given by Samuel Rajzman at the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal:

Transports arrived there every day; their number depended on the number of trains arriving; sometimes three, four, or five trains filled exclusively with Jews -- from Czechoslovakia, Germany, Greece, and Poland. Immediately after their arrival, the people had to leave the trains in 5 minutes and line up on the platform. All those who were driven from the cars were divided into groups -- men, children, and women, all separate. They were all forced to strip immediately, and this procedure continued under the lashes of the German guards' whips. Workers who were employed in this operation immediately picked up all the clothes and carried them away to barracks. Then the people were obliged to walk naked through the street to the gas chambers.

At first there were no signboards whatsoever at the station, but a few months later the commander of the camp, one Kurt Franz, built a first-class railroad station with signboards. The barracks where the clothing was stored had signs reading "restaurant," "ticket office," "telegraph," "telephone," and so forth. There were even train schedules for the departure and the arrival of trains to and from Grodno, Suwalki, Vienna, and Berlin.



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